INTRODUCTION


There seems to be a scarcity of UK retirement blogs out there (other than those proffering financial advice) and in the absence of my being able to read about other people's experiences, I instead offer you my own "Great Big Retirement Adventure."

My husband (Mister E) and I have moved from the initial concept through the planning stages to implementation and this site is intended to record the whole process. What I am seeking from retirement is now very different to what I thought I was planning and has gradually developed into a quest for fitness and a desire for simplification, with a transition away from both a highly organised lifestyle and the personality traits reflecting a pedantic professional career. Indeed I recently described myself as "a goofy idiot" who enjoys smiling at sunflowers; a far cry from the pre-retirement professional and an indication of just how far I have travelled.

Please visit from time to time and do add your comments. The blog is in reverse chronological order but popular posts and those highlighting our journey are specifically pinpointed below on the right hand side together with a list of topics covered. Alternatively you may prefer to look at the summary or wisdom we have acquired or even our have done list with its retirement atlas and dip in and out of the blog using the links given.




Saturday, 20 June 2015

Gardening Woes



I have finally planted my vegetable patch after first giving priority to the flower borders. Save for onions and potatoes which are growing rapidly, it is currently a mass of neatly groomed earth hopefully nursing seeds that will shortly break through the surface.

When working I had to put up with most temperatures in order to tend the plot, drawing the line only at digging in the rain. In retirement I was, therefore, looking forward to the scope to spend my weekdays in the garden. Now either the weather has been particularly cold and windy this year or alternatively I am becoming very choosy but this week I have had to pull myself up short, don a fleece and get out there after realising that if I wait for the thermometer to hit the mid teens (celsius) and the sun to shine too, I might never get all my seeds sown.

Now they are in, it would be easy to imagine that I have induced a state of heat and drought to descend upon the North East of England. However, after studying the long range weather forecast this seems very unlikely at the present time, and I anticipate being spared the joys of heaving watering cans from butt to vegetable patch for some time yet.


3 comments:

  1. I am successfully keeping my flower beds alive. I have just put in a border of annuals in ground that hadn't yet been planted. If they survive, I will try to put perennials in next year. Just wanted to see if the soil worked before investing the money. I am also growing a small herb garden. Trying to decide if I want to build another bed from scratch. It would be a lot of work, and kind of iffy, but I am sort of wanting something that is mine. I am not growing vegetables yet. The growing season is just so short here.

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  2. Yes gardens are a lot of work but retirement certainly means I keep the hoe moving more than I used to and therefore the weeds suppressed. I'm now at a point where, after 15 years creating my garden, I have a reasonable idea as to what will and will not grow (although the vagaries of the British climate always throws up a surprise or two) and I now generally divide and replant established perennials rather than sow annuals. Herbs are great though; they seem to thrive regardless, but I'd love to be able to curtail the mint!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yes gardens are a lot of work but retirement certainly means I keep the hoe moving more than I used to and therefore the weeds suppressed. I'm now at a point where, after 15 years creating my garden, I have a reasonable idea as to what will and will not grow (although the vagaries of the British climate always throws up a surprise or two) and I now generally divide and replant established perennials rather than sow annuals. Herbs are great though; they seem to thrive regardless, but I'd love to be able to curtail the mint!!

    ReplyDelete